Tag Archive | Chiron

“Chiron” is done for now.

Updated with final version of painting.

it's still raw

My big paintings are taking all my time from the works on paper right now. I will share those here so you don’t forget about me.

Chiron lectures on war and sustainability oil on canvas 40 x 30″

If you click on the image through to a bigger image size, you will make me happy, because this painting is too big to show well at the blog display size.

Chiron lectures on war and sustainability

I was thinking about Epicurus again, this part of his extant teachings. I did a painting based directly on this passage last year, but Chiron above is definitely about this somehow for me. That means nothing for what you the viewer will make of it, and that’s completely ok.

Death is no concern to us. All things good and bad are experienced through sensation, but sensation ceases at death. So death is nothing to us, and to know this makes…

View original post 359 more words

“Chiron” is done for now.

My big paintings are taking all my time from the works on paper right now. I will share those here so you don’t forget about me.

Chiron lectures on war and sustainability oil on canvas 40 x 30″

If you click on the image through to a bigger image size, you will make me happy, because this painting is too big to show well at the blog display size.

Chiron lectures on war and sustainability

I was thinking about Epicurus again, this part of his extant teachings. I did a painting based directly on this passage last year, but Chiron above is definitely about this somehow for me. That means nothing for what you the viewer will make of it, and that’s completely ok.

Death is no concern to us. All things good and bad are experienced through sensation, but sensation ceases at death. So death is nothing to us, and to know this makes a mortal life happy. Life is not improved by adding infinite time; removing the desire for immortality is what’s required. There is no reason why one who is convinced that there is nothing to fear at death should fear anything about it during life. And whoever says that he dreads death not because it’s painful to experience, but only because it’s painful to contemplate, is foolish. It is pointless to agonize over something that brings no trouble when it arrives. So death, the most dreaded of evils, is nothing to us, because when we exist, death is not present, and when death is present, we do not exist. It neither concerns the living nor the dead, since death does not exist for the living, and the dead no longer exist. 

Most people, however, either dread death as the greatest of suffering or long for it as a relief from suffering. One who is wise neither renounces life nor fears not living. Life does not offend him, nor does he suppose that not living is any kind of suffering. For just as he would not choose the greatest amount of food over what is most delicious, so too he does not seek the longest possible life, but rather the happiest. And he who advises the young man to live well and the old man to die well is also foolish – not only because it’s desirable to live, but because the art of living well and the art of dying well are the same. And he was still more wrong who said it would be better to have never been born, but that “Once born, be quick to pass through the gates of Hades!” {Theognis, 425 – 427} If he was being serious, why wasn’t he himself quick to end his life? Certainly the means were available if this was what he really wanted to do. But if he was not serious, then we have even less reason to believe him.

Future days are neither wholly ours, nor wholly not ours. We must neither depend on them as sure to come nor despair that we won’t live to see them.

Chiron– oil on canvas– in progress

 

Painting– progress shot– unfinished.

 

Chiron, progress shot, unfinished

 

Still easing back into my usual routine after some travel– I do have another envelope in progress, had hoped to finish it today, but it is getting flat under a stack of heavy art books, because a new paper I used buckled like whoa.

One of the benefits of the envelope pieces is that they are comparatively quick to do and let me get my ideas out there without having to turn every idea into a canvas that will take weeks if not months to finish.

But having done two envelopes with Chiron… I realized I had enough of a crush on the image that I wanted to take on doing a painting on canvas. So here it is (above) in oil, VERY NOT DONE, at 40 x 30″. No crits please, but if you like or relate somehow, feel free to let me know.

Another envelope soon!

Here’s one of the Chiron envelope works I liked so much I was sure I wanted him in a bigger painting with more content and  COLOR. And that it would be worth the trouble. 🙂

Chiron.

 

Chiron #2.

Chiron #2.

“Decide no suit, until you have heard both sides speak.” -fragment, “Precepts of Chiron” maybe by Hesiod

Chiron #2. mixed media on interoffice envelope 15 x 10″

purchase info HERE

Chiron #2.

The drawing is done in hard light graphite pencil which turns silvery in most light and the piece is hard to photograph. I decided it’s a feature not a problem, but it is a problem to show the piece on the internets.

I plopped it on a flatbed scanner and tried that way. Here is a detail shot.

Chiron #2. (detail)

Anyway. Why does Chiron have human legs? In the oldest ancient Greek images, he was given human legs to set him apart from the centaurs, who were a rowdy bunch and not at all learned. He was also shown wearing clothing, because he was civilized.

The Romans preferred to depict him with equine legs only, and they also gave him horsey ears.

Oh goody there is an image on wikimedia commons, so I can show you.

And another: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:DSC00301_-_Chirone_e_Achille_-_500_a.C._-_Foto_G._Dall%27Orto.jpg

Chiron.

Chiron.

Chiron. mixed media on interoffice envelope 15 x 10″

purchase info HERE

Chiron.